Broadstone Community Speed Watch – Update

With the many and various restrictions/issues associated with the Corona Virus pandemic in force, Broadstone Community Speed Watch has decided to postpone the two ‘Meet the Public’ events that it was planning to hold on the 25th April and the 9th May 2020, on the Broadway in front of the M&S Foodhall.

It is intended that both these events will be held at some time in the future when it is both safe and appropriate to do so. Watch this space for futher news.

Similarly, and following advice received from Dorset Police, Broadstone Community Speed Watch have suspended speed watch activities. Broadstone Community Speed Watch operations will only recommence when authority to mount such operations has been received from Dorset Police.

If, during this period when CSW is not operational, you have any issues with speeding vehicles, you should report such activity directly to Dorset Police.

Drive safely and drive responsibly, above all stay safe and stay well.

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – March 2020

‘Safer roads, safer community, safer Broadstone’

March – the month when it dawns on some of us that those pesky New Year’s resolutions are harder to live up to than originally thought, and the month when gardens begin to exhibit the early signs of Spring? March is also time for me to pen another article for our readers, and hopefully supporters? However, in this issue, I am going to reiterate of successes of last year for those who might not have read or received the February publication.

In 2019, between the 1st January to the 31st December, your Community Speed Watch team achieved the following;

Operations completed 110
Operations cancelled 17
Vehicles monitored 42,306
Vehicles recorded speeding 508

This achievement was recognised by Dorset Police Chief Constable who presented your BCSW with their second commendation in two years.

In previous BCSW articles there have been several requests for more volunteers, and sad to say only a few enquiries have been received.
But before dismissing this article as just another request for volunteers please ask yourself these questions :

  • Do you regard speeding where you live to be a serious issue?
  • Does speeding affect your quality of life?
  • Would you be prepared to do something about it?

If the answer to these questions is YES –

  • then would YOU can do something to reduce the numbers of speeding vehicles by joining Broadstone Community Speed Watch? In doing so you will be joining a dedicated team of like-minded volunteers, all of whom live in Broadstone, and who wish to make Broadstone. and those drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists, pedestrians and residents who use our roads, safer for all concerned.

If you are interested in Community Speed Watch, and want to know more, BCSW intend to set up some ‘Meet your Community Speed Watch team’ events on the Broadway outside Marks & Spencer’s in the Spring. Dates and times will be promulgated nearer the time.

Otherwise come and talk to us when we are operating at the roadside, or contact us by e-mail at enquiries@broadstonecsw.uk

Think safe, drive safe, be safe!

BCSW


As published in the Broadstone Link magazine for March 2020

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – February 2020

‘Safer roads, safer community, safer Broadstone’

February – the month when the true cost of Christmas appears on our credit card statements. The month when winter seems to be never ending. So, time to re-energise, get ready for the Spring, and to look forward to warmer days. We in Broadstone Community Speed Watch will certainly welcome some warmth, and hopefully some more support.

In 2019, between the 1st January to the 31st December your Community Speed Watch team achieved the following;

Operations Completed 110
Operations cancelled 17
Vehicles monitored 42,306
Vehicles recorded speeding 508

This achievement was recognised by Dorset Police Chief Constable who presented your BCSW with their second commendation in two years.

In previous BCSW articles there have been several requests for more volunteers, and sad to say not one enquiry has been received.
But before dismissing this article as just another request for volunteers please ask yourself these questions :

  • Do you regard speeding where you live to be a serious issue?
  • Does speeding affect your quality of life?

If the answer to either or both of these questions is YES – then would you be prepared to give one hour a month to help Broadstone Community Speed Watch to reduce the numbers of speeding vehicles in and around Broadstone. You will be joining a dedicated team of like-minded volunteers, all of whom live in Broadstone, and who wish to make a difference.

To anyone who might question CSW, and what it does, we would just ask “Which is more likely to kill or injure someone – a speeding vehicle or a Community Speed Watch team? Statistics show that where CSW teams operate the numbers of speeders reduce considerably.

If you are interested in Community Speed Watch, and want to know more, BCSW intend to set up some ‘Meet your Community Speed Watch team’ events on the Broadway outside Marks & Spencer’s in the Spring. Dates and times will be promulgated nearer the time.

Otherwise come and talk to us when we are operating at the roadside, or contact us by e-mail at enquiries@broadstonecsw.uk

Stay safe.

BCSW


As published in the Broadstone Link magazine for February 2020

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – January 2020

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Happy New Year!

Possible New Year’s resolutions:-

  • Take more exercise
  • Be a better person
  • Help others
  • Join Broadstone community Speed Watch

Well this is how it might be in an ideal world, or maybe not? But joining Community Speed Watch could be a way to achieving all four? If you can spare an hour or two a month why not give it a try.

If you are interested just contact me on www.broadstonecsw.uk/contact-us, contact your NPT (Neighbourhood Policing Team) or contact Dorset police and ask for details as to how you might join you nearest CSW team.

If you would like to ’try before you buy’ let me know and you can come to one of our roadside operations as an observer.

Broadstone Community Speed Watch is one of the best in the County and highly regarded by Dorset Police, and you will be joining a dedicated and professional team.

That said we have a new year ahead of us, and BCSW will be operating as usual in the months ahead. If you are a driver, motorcyclist or cyclist then this is the time of the year when you are most vulnerable. Do make sure that you and your vehicle of choice is fit for the road.

Check lights, tyres, indicators, windscreen wipers and make sure you can see and be seen.

On a cold and frosty morning it is important that vehicle drivers clear frost/ice/snow from windscreens and side/rear windows before setting off on their journey.

With reduced light levels it is important that headlights, sidelights and indicators are all working correctly.

With slippery road surfaces it is important to ensure that tyre tread depth is legal, and that tyre pressures are correct.

Do remember that speed is a key factor in up to a third of all road accidents/collisions. Be prepared to tailor your speed to the prevailing conditions.

Broadstone Community Speed Watch volunteers regularly observe vehicles with screens not cleared, defective lights, inappropriate speeding, and worst of all ‘tailgating’.

Remember – Think safe, Be safe!

BCSW

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – December 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Merry Christmas

December seems to have come around far too quickly. This may, in part, be due to the fact that your small, but highly effective, Community Speed Watch team of volunteers has once again been extra ordinarily busy carrying out and completing in excess of 100 Community Speed Watch operations in the 12 months since 1st January 2019.

For the second year in succession your team of volunteers have topped the CSW league table for the number of Community Speed Watch operations mounted and completed by CSW teams across the whole of Dorset.

This outstanding achievement was recognised at the CSW Conference held in Dorchester in October this year when The Chief Constable presented members of our Watch with a Certificate of Commendation.

Having our efforts recognised is important as it not only acknowledges the effort put in by your dedicated volunteers, but it also motivates and energises the whole team. But this on it’s own is not sufficient, and of equal importance is the support of Broadstone residents. So a huge ‘thank you’ to all those drivers, motor cyclists, cyclists, pedestrians and others who wave, give the ‘thumbs up’ sign, and come to talk to us at the roadside. Without your support we could not and would not do what we do!

Now, as you might expect, your existing volunteers are well motivated and determined to keep Broadstone safe, but like all similar organisations Community Speed Watch relies on a supply of volunteers, and Broadstone Community Speed Watch is no exception.

So, when the excitement and indulgences of Christmas have passed, and when it is time for New Year’s resolutions – consider what you can do for your community in 2020. If you can spare one or two hours a month then please do consider joining Broadstone Community Speed Watch. The more volunteers we have the more we can do to make Broadstone ‘a safer place to live’.

Wishing you all for a Merry Christmas, and an amazing New Year.

Remember – If you drink, don’t drive!

BCSW

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – November 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

In recent months there have been references to Police Officers and others joining in with Community Speed Watch volunteers when the Speed Watch team are engaged in carrying out Speed watch operations. To avoid any confusion please see an explanation below:-

It is true that Police Officers, Police Community Support Officers and Police Staff may join a Community Speed Watch team at the roadside, but the purpose of such attendance may differ. These are shown below;

  1. Officers may join a Community Speed Watch team to supervise, provide training or just to offer moral support. In this case the Community Speed Watch team will operate as normal.
  2. Police Officers will on occasion conduct their own speed enforcement from a Speed Watch site alongside the team using a hand held laser device. This is usually done as part of a wider policing operation aimed at raising awareness of speed and other traffic offences.
  3. TruCam – this is an initiative launched by Dorset Road Safe with officers from Dorset Police joining Community Speed Watch volunteers to conduct joint sessions. These officers use a laser detector that is mounted on a tripod which they alone will operate.

In categories 2 add 3 above, when Police Officers are operational, the Community Speed Watch team will be required to suspend their operation, but remain close by as required. A Community Speed Watch volunteer will continue to count the numbers of vehicles passing the location.

Community Speed Watch is a way to remind drivers of the need to drive within the speed limit set. The letters sent out as a result of Speed Watch monitoring are only advisory. However, drivers need to understand that Speed Watch is supported by Dorset Police and that there may also be an occasion when a member of Police staff is present and enforcement will be carried out.

Needless to say, the supervision, training and support, provided by Dorset Police is greatly appreciated by Community Speed Watch volunteers.

Winter is nigh – check lights, tyres, wiper blades etc!

BCSW

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – October 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

“Why don’t you get a life!” the van driver shouted through the driver’s side window of his van, as he drove past the Speed Watch team. Had the driver stopped and had a conversation with the team he might have appreciated that we would indeed prefer not to have to stand by the roadside recording the details of vehicles whose drivers seem to have an unhealthy disregard for speed limits, and the reasons why such speed limits are put in place on our urban and rural roads.

The driver might also understand that in January 2017, this team of volunteers had the choice of ceasing Broadstone Community Speed Watch operations, or to reform and to continue. The team took the decision to continue, and since that time has risen to be the best performing CSW team in the County.

So, the answer to the driver’s question is “yes, we would prefer to do something else” but Community Speed Watch provides us with an opportunity to give back something to the community within which we are privileged to live, and in doing so make Broadstone a safer place to live

Community Speed Watch aims to inform, educate and raise awareness among the Driver community regarding the risks of serious injury and deaths that can arise directly from inappropriate and excessive speed. Community Speed Watch is responding directly to concerns raised by Broadstone residents.

But, I hear someone say, with BCSW carrying out in excess of 100 operations each year, surely speeding is no longer an issue? If only that were true – this year to date we have recorded more than 50 vehicles being driven at speeds in excess of 40 mph, and a motorcyclist travelling at 68 mph! – on roads with a 30 mph speed limit!

So, there is still more to do, and to do this we have an ever present need for more volunteers. If you think you might be interested in joining our team please have a look at the www.broadstonecsw.uk website.

Think, drive safely!

BCSW

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – August/September 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Speeding is a regular feature in our lives and on our roads, and it is most unlikely that there is any driver or motorcyclist has never intentionally, or unintentionally, exceeded the posted speed limit at some time or other, on any given road.

The question that is difficult to answer is why? Especially when the evidence indicates that excessive speed is a factor in almost one third of all accidents where fatalities and/or serious life changing injuries result.

Continue reading “Broadstone Community Speed Watch – August/September 2019”

Police embed with community speed watch teams after volunteers are abused and threatened

NEXT time you spot a group of community speed watch volunteers in Dorset, look out – they might have a police officer hidden among them.

That’s the message from Dorset Police after some volunteers were verbally abused and confronted by furious motorists.

Speed watch teams cannot issue speeding tickets themselves. Instead, drivers hitting top speeds will receive warning letters through the post.

However, if a driver is caught three times, they can expect to be tracked by Dorset’s traffic officers under Op Dragoon.

Continue reading “Police embed with community speed watch teams after volunteers are abused and threatened”

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – July 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Broadstone Community Speed Watch was established in 2013 against a background of increasing numbers of road casualties and deaths in the county, and rising concerns in many communities regarding the risks posed to all residents by speeding vehicles.

In order to establish Community Speed Watch in Broadstone, residents were requested to identify roads in our community where speeding was a serious concern. The roads identified were then risk assessed by Dorset Police, and a set number of roads were confirmed as being suitable for Community Speed Watch operations.

Continue reading “Broadstone Community Speed Watch – July 2019”