Happy New Year!

Happy New Year to one and all from Broadstone Community Speed Watch!

January is a month when we reflect on times past, seek new adventures and/or challenges, struggle to stick to New Year’s resolutions, avoid the bathroom scales etc, but the New Year also brings new opportunities. This is most definitely the case with Community Speed Watch.

In 2018, and for the second year in succession, BCSW completed more than 100 CSW operations, monitoring over 30,000 vehicle movements across our local roads. This is no mean feat when you consider that for much of the year we only drew from a pool of 10 volunteers. To continue to operate like this and unless we recruit new volunteers, we will risk losing the existing goodwill that enables us to operate.

So, if you wish to support your community, and make a difference, please consider joining this group of volunteers, all of whom are local residents.

All new volunteers must be at least 18 years of age, and in good health.

Volunteers will have to agree to minimal, and appropriate, vetting by a representative of Dorset Police.

If accepted, new volunteers will receive training in the use of CSW equipment, and safety training. Every CSW operation is supervised by a trained and suitably qualified team member.

CSW operations are from 30 mins to one hour in duration, at locations assessed and approved by Dorset Police.

If you think you might be interested contact enquiries@broadstonecsw.uk, and/or if you wish to talk to an existing volunteer just provide a contact name and telephone number and one of us will call you back.

You may also make enquiries via the Dorset Police non-emergency number 101, or by e-mail to enquiries@Dorset.PNN.Police.uk

For genuine enquiries we may also offer a ‘try before you buy’ session so that you may see first hand what we do, and how we operate.

Every best wish for 2019.

BCSW

Tackling Rural Crime In Dorset – Fly-tipping and Speeding

Work is already underway in Dorset to tackle two key concerns highlighted amongst rural communities by a national survey. Respondents to the 2018 National Crime Survey identified fly-tipping and speeding as the crime types they were most concerned about.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill is a member of the National Rural Crime Network who commissioned the survey and is the national lead for fly-tipping. He said: “We have beautiful countryside right on our doorstep but it isn’t just attractive to us, it is also attractive to criminals.

“Fly-tipping blights our rural landscape and has a detrimental impact on the environment as well as generally being an eyesore.

“Fly-tipping is a complex issue and requires a multi-agency approach. The Problem Solving Forum I recently held on the issue brought together partners and agencies with Dorset Police to discuss the problem and a partnership action plan is now in place to tackle it.”

According to the survey, the percentage of Dorset respondents who thought speeding was a problem has reduced by over 30% since the last national rural crime survey in 2015. This is a greater reduction than was seen nationally where the figure has come down by only 21% over the same period.

Martyn Underhill continued: “For a small force, Dorset Police is already punching well above its weight in tackling driving related offences. It’s well known No Excuse team has had many successes in tackling the ‘fatal five’ driving offences in our county, of which speeding is one. The dedicated road safety team is even being replicated in other forces.

“The Force also works closely with community speedwatch groups and funds various initiatives to educate drivers from all backgrounds about the dangers of speeding.

“Road safety is an area Dorset Police has focused on and the work it is doing is making a difference. But 30% of Dorset respondents still feel that speeding is a problem so we cannot be complacent.”

Dorset Police has had a Rural Crime Team since 2016 as a result of one of the police and crime commissioner’s election pledges. The team is dedicated to tackling rural crime and issues, with a focus on crime prevention. They have trained fellow officers, call handlers and radio operators to ensure that the Force is dealing with reports of rural crime consistently and effectively.

According to the survey approximately half (47%) of all Dorset respondents were aware of the specialist Rural Crime Team, compared to just 32% of respondents nationally who were of aware of their local rural crime teams.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill said: “Almost half of Dorset’s residents live in rural areas and it is important that they are engaged and their voices are heard. Having met with a number of farmers, rural business owners and residents on my patrol visit with the Rural Crime Team earlier this year, it is clear that progress has been made in reducing the fear of rural crime in Dorset.

“The results of the survey also confirm what we already suspected – that rural crime is massively under-reported. We want to encourage people living and/or working in rural Dorset to report crime. There seems to be a culture of not reporting crime in some rural areas and this is something the Rural Crime Team is trying to address.

“I am pleased the percentage in Dorset of people living in rural areas not reporting crime is lower (28%) than the national figure (36%). Police cannot tackle crime if they are not made aware that it is happening in the first place. Similarly, intelligence is needed to help bring offenders to justice. It is therefore vital that the public come forward with information and report crime to help the police help victims.”

The National Rural Crime Survey received over 20,000 responses with more than 600 responses coming from Dorset residents.

Message Sent By
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)