2018 is Safest Year Ever On Dorset Roads

Since 2012, the number of people killed and seriously injured on Dorset’s roads has shown a sustained fall.

In 2012 it was 355, in 2018 with figures to be confirmed, it was 239, a reduction of slightly more than 32.

Slight or minor collisions have showed a similar reduction of a little over 30%.

An average of 378 people were killed or seriously injured on Dorset’s roads in the preceding 13 years (1999 – 2011), again showing a steady reduction to the present.

Chief Constable James Vaughan, Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill and Head of Roads Policing Chief Inspector Adrian Leisk have put the positive change down to active and intelligence led roads policing, investment of funds and resources and close partnership working.

Continue reading “2018 is Safest Year Ever On Dorset Roads”

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year to one and all from Broadstone Community Speed Watch!

January is a month when we reflect on times past, seek new adventures and/or challenges, struggle to stick to New Year’s resolutions, avoid the bathroom scales etc, but the New Year also brings new opportunities. This is most definitely the case with Community Speed Watch.

In 2018, and for the second year in succession, BCSW completed more than 100 CSW operations, monitoring over 30,000 vehicle movements across our local roads. This is no mean feat when you consider that for much of the year we only drew from a pool of 10 volunteers. To continue to operate like this and unless we recruit new volunteers, we will risk losing the existing goodwill that enables us to operate.

Continue reading “Happy New Year!”

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – January 2019

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Your Broadstone Community Speed Watch team of volunteers would like to wish everyone residing in Broadstone a truly happy New Year, and may 2019 be your safest to date.

2019 may be a new year, yet many of the challenges we faced on a daily basis in 2018 will not have changed. More vehicles, motorcycles, cyclists and pedestrians competing for the same space. Patience and respect for each other will be ever more important.

Winter conditions will, as you might expect, challenge road users for some months to come so it will be ever important that you do whatever is necessary to ensure that, whatever the form of transport you use to move around in, both the transport and you are fit for purpose. In particular, and in an age where today’s vehicles tend not to be garaged overnight, there is the need to ensure that vehicle windscreens and windows are completely cleared of ice/frost/mist before setting off on your journey. Allow extra time for scraping off the ice etc, and allow extra time for your journey.

Wet and slippery road surfaces present their own challenges, and BCSW regularly observe and record vehicles speeding in just about all conditions. But it is often the case that, in addition to speeding, drivers are also observed tailgating the vehicle in front of them. Speeding and tailgating are equally inappropriate and dangerous but when combined are, especially in hazardous road conditions, potentially lethal. So please do observe the speed limits, and do leave plenty of distance between you and the vehicle in front of you.

Finally, some more questions;-

  1. What distance do you cover in 1 second, in a vehicle travelling at 30 mph?
  2. What does a solid amber light mean at a set of traffic lights?
  3. At what age do you have to renew your driving licence?
  4. Name the five most common causes of collisions.

Answers to the above may be found on www.dorsetroadsafe.org.uk

Suggested New Year’s resolution – Drive safely and Drive well.

Happy New Year!

BCSW

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – December 2018

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Broadstone Community Speed Watch is celebrating its second Christmas since it was relaunched in May 2017 and we would like to wish all Broadstone residents, whether supporters or not, a very Merry Christmas.

The last 12 months has seen us build on the achievements of the previous year, and Dorset Police tell us that our efforts are having a beneficial effect in terms of reduced numbers of drivers speeding on our local roads. Whilst much of this may be down to the regular operations run by your BCSW team, credit must also go to those responsible members of the driving public who are making changes to their driving behaviour. So, a sincere thank you to all those drivers who have contributed to this encouraging result.

To residents who have come to talk with us at the roadside, we would say a heartfelt ‘thank you’. We will always be happy to listen to your questions and concerns, and to do what we can to help.

To those drivers who wave, smile, give us the ‘thumbs up’ – thank you. You are our motivation.

To those who do not agree with what we do, please engage with us. We will always be happy to listen to your concerns too.

Now, in some households, there may be periods of time on Christmas day when folk relax to recover from the excitement, and some indulge in a quiz. So here are some questions to test the drivers in your family/friends –

  1. On what type of roads do most collisions occur?
  2. What is the cause of 98% of collisions?
  3. What is the minimum recommended following distance in a motor vehicle, in good conditions?
  4. How do you know when the speed limit is 30 mph?
  5. Using a mobile phone whilst driving increases your chance of having a collision by how many times.

Answers to the above, and more, may be found on www.dorsetroadsafe.org.uk. – section 29.

Remember it is better to arrive late, than to be late!

Drive well, drive safely.

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – November 2018

‘Making Broadstone a safer place to live’

Well, the long cold fingers of winter are slowly but surely stretching out to touch us as we move into shorter days and longer nights. This of course brings challenges to us all, and especially the elderly and the young as they make their way to and from their respective destinations such as shops, schools, relatives, friends etc.

It also, not unexpectedly, brings challenges to all road users whether they be on two, four or more wheels. Such challenges most commonly encountered being low light levels and reduced visibility, misted up vehicle windows, wet and/or slippery road surfaces, potholes, pedestrians/cyclists not wearing high visible clothing and more.

So, if you have not done so already, do ensure that both you and your vehicle/motorbike/bicycles are fit for the conditions that you will encounter from now until early next year.

So, I suspect some of you will be asking, what has this got to do with Community Speed Watch? The answer is that Broadstone Community Speed Watch does not go into hibernation during the winter months. The reason for this being that it is even more important, in these darker and colder months, that all road users drive carefully and are mindful of the frequently changing conditions. It is also important to have regard for the speed limits in force on our major and minor roads. We will therefore be operating as normal, and we would ask all of you to help us to reduce the risks that arise from unnecessary and inappropriate speeding on our local roads.

Readers of the Broadstone Link magazine will have noticed that the September and October issues carried our plea for volunteers to join the existing Broadstone Community Speed Watch team. To put it simply, without new volunteers, we will not be able to replace those currently and ably carrying out Speed Watch operations in our village. One hour a week is all that is required, and the more volunteers we have the lighter the workload for all.

Thank you.

Drive well and drive safely.

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – October 2018

The Dorset Police Community Speed Watch Unit currently supports over 60 Community Speed Watch teams across Dorset, and it is their stated ambition to create and establish a total of 100 such teams in the near future.

In 2017 the existing Community Speed Watch teams achieved the following;-

Total Community Speed Watch sessions mounted 894
Total number of vehicles monitored 241699
Total number of vehicles observed and recorded as speeding 8605*
Total number of Warning letters issued by Dorset Police 6687

*Speeding as laid down in ACPO guidelines i:e; The posted speed limit plus 10% + 2mph.

The above was an outstanding effort by all concerned, and even more so due to the fact that all the above were carried out by volunteers from your Dorset communities. Such volunteers having been vetted, trained and supported by the Dorset Police CSW Unit.

It will not come as a surprise that the success or otherwise of such an initiative depends wholly upon their being sufficient and suitable volunteers to mount CSW operations, to perform the required tasks involved in carrying out such operations, and to produce the necessary reports at the end of each operation.

The wartime poster stating ‘Your country needs you’ is ever more true if our ever busier roads are to be safe for use by all road users motorists, cyclists, motorcyclists, pedestrians and others.

So if you are considering setting up a Speed watch for your community, or maybe joining an existing Speed Watch team, you may do so as follows;-

Contact the PCSO, appointed as CSW liaison officer , in your local Safer Neighbourhood Team (SNT)

Or

Telephone the non-Emergency Police contact number 101 and seek advice

Or

Go to the Dorset police website, look up CSW, and fill in the on-line enquiry form.

Or

Speak directly to a member of an existing Community Speed watch team

Please note that all existing CSW volunteers, and new volunteers wishing to form, or join, a Community Speed Watch, will have to undergo a basic form of vetting carried out by a suitably qualified Police officer /PCSO. Once accepted suitable volunteers will be trained by Dorset police.

Drive well and drive safely

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – September 2018

The Dorset Police Community Speed Watch Unit currently supports over 60 Community Speed Watch teams across Dorset, and it is their stated ambition to create and establish a total of 100 such teams in the near future.

In 2017 the existing Community Speed Watch teams achieved the following;-

Total Community Speed Watch sessions mounted 894
Total number of vehicles monitored 241699
Total number of vehicles observed and recorded as speeding 8605*
Total number of Warning letters issued by Dorset Police 6687

*Speeding as laid down in ACPO guidelines i:e; The posted speed limit plus 10% + 2mph.

The above was an outstanding effort by all concerned, and even more so due to the fact that all the above were carried out by volunteers from your Dorset communities. Such volunteers having been vetted, trained and supported by the Dorset Police CSW Unit.

It will not come as a surprise that the success or otherwise of such an initiative depends wholly upon their being sufficient and suitable volunteers to mount CSW operations, to perform the required tasks involved in carrying out such operations, and to produce the necessary reports at the end of each operation.

The wartime poster stating ‘Your country needs you’ is ever more true if our ever busier roads are to be safe for use by all road users motorists, cyclists, motorcyclists, pedestrians and others.

So if you are considering setting up a Speed watch for your community, or maybe joining an existing Speed Watch team, you may do so as follows;-

Contact the PCSO, appointed as CSW liaison officer , in your local Safer Neighbourhood Team (SNT)

Or

Telephone the non-Emergency Police contact number 101 and seek advice

Or

Go to the Dorset police website, look up CSW, and fill in the on-line enquiry form.

Or

Speak directly to a member of an existing Community Speed watch team

Please note that all existing CSW volunteers, and new volunteers wishing to form, or join, a Community Speed Watch, will have to undergo a basic form of vetting carried out by a suitably qualified Police officer /PCSO. Once accepted suitable volunteers will be trained by Dorset police.

Drive well and drive safely

Tackling Rural Crime In Dorset – Fly-tipping and Speeding

Work is already underway in Dorset to tackle two key concerns highlighted amongst rural communities by a national survey. Respondents to the 2018 National Crime Survey identified fly-tipping and speeding as the crime types they were most concerned about.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill is a member of the National Rural Crime Network who commissioned the survey and is the national lead for fly-tipping. He said: “We have beautiful countryside right on our doorstep but it isn’t just attractive to us, it is also attractive to criminals.

“Fly-tipping blights our rural landscape and has a detrimental impact on the environment as well as generally being an eyesore.

“Fly-tipping is a complex issue and requires a multi-agency approach. The Problem Solving Forum I recently held on the issue brought together partners and agencies with Dorset Police to discuss the problem and a partnership action plan is now in place to tackle it.”

According to the survey, the percentage of Dorset respondents who thought speeding was a problem has reduced by over 30% since the last national rural crime survey in 2015. This is a greater reduction than was seen nationally where the figure has come down by only 21% over the same period.

Martyn Underhill continued: “For a small force, Dorset Police is already punching well above its weight in tackling driving related offences. It’s well known No Excuse team has had many successes in tackling the ‘fatal five’ driving offences in our county, of which speeding is one. The dedicated road safety team is even being replicated in other forces.

“The Force also works closely with community speedwatch groups and funds various initiatives to educate drivers from all backgrounds about the dangers of speeding.

“Road safety is an area Dorset Police has focused on and the work it is doing is making a difference. But 30% of Dorset respondents still feel that speeding is a problem so we cannot be complacent.”

Dorset Police has had a Rural Crime Team since 2016 as a result of one of the police and crime commissioner’s election pledges. The team is dedicated to tackling rural crime and issues, with a focus on crime prevention. They have trained fellow officers, call handlers and radio operators to ensure that the Force is dealing with reports of rural crime consistently and effectively.

According to the survey approximately half (47%) of all Dorset respondents were aware of the specialist Rural Crime Team, compared to just 32% of respondents nationally who were of aware of their local rural crime teams.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill said: “Almost half of Dorset’s residents live in rural areas and it is important that they are engaged and their voices are heard. Having met with a number of farmers, rural business owners and residents on my patrol visit with the Rural Crime Team earlier this year, it is clear that progress has been made in reducing the fear of rural crime in Dorset.

“The results of the survey also confirm what we already suspected – that rural crime is massively under-reported. We want to encourage people living and/or working in rural Dorset to report crime. There seems to be a culture of not reporting crime in some rural areas and this is something the Rural Crime Team is trying to address.

“I am pleased the percentage in Dorset of people living in rural areas not reporting crime is lower (28%) than the national figure (36%). Police cannot tackle crime if they are not made aware that it is happening in the first place. Similarly, intelligence is needed to help bring offenders to justice. It is therefore vital that the public come forward with information and report crime to help the police help victims.”

The National Rural Crime Survey received over 20,000 responses with more than 600 responses coming from Dorset residents.

Message Sent By
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – August 2018

Making Broadstone a safer place to live

To begin with BCSW would like to place on record our thanks to all those people who visited our stand at the Broadstone Family Fun Day. We much enjoyed meeting you, and trust that we answered all your many and interesting questions. Whether or not you support our Community Speed Watch activities we will always be prepared to meet and discuss what we do, and why we carry out our operations on the roads in and around our community.

In the July issue of this magazine Broadstone Community Speed Watch sought to address some of the negative comments made recently on social media, and this article continues in that vein. The aim being to separate fiction from fact, and to offer explanations for what we do, and why we carry out Community Speed Watch operations.

Fiction: I was glared at by them!

Fact: It is never intended to further aggravate vehicle drivers by ‘glaring’ at them, regardless of whether or not they are speeding. However, in the process of recording the necessary information required as part of our reporting process, it is necessary to establish the correct registration number, the make, model and colour of every vehicle being recorded. This does require CSW team members recording such details to look closely at these vehicles. The other times that CSW team members will look purposefully into vehicles will be to ascertain whether or not the vehicle driver is wearing a seat belt, or is using a hand held mobile telephone or device.

Fiction: They were operating at a time when there were no children around?

Fact: Speed restrictions placed on roads apply 24 hrs a day, and this regardless of whether or not there are children around at the time. It is an established fact that speeding vehicles do present an increased risk of harm or serious injury to all other road users, and are a contributory factor in up to a third of all serious road collisions.

So, until the next time – Drive well and drive safely.

BCSW