Tackling Rural Crime In Dorset – Fly-tipping and Speeding

Work is already underway in Dorset to tackle two key concerns highlighted amongst rural communities by a national survey. Respondents to the 2018 National Crime Survey identified fly-tipping and speeding as the crime types they were most concerned about.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill is a member of the National Rural Crime Network who commissioned the survey and is the national lead for fly-tipping. He said: “We have beautiful countryside right on our doorstep but it isn’t just attractive to us, it is also attractive to criminals.

“Fly-tipping blights our rural landscape and has a detrimental impact on the environment as well as generally being an eyesore.

“Fly-tipping is a complex issue and requires a multi-agency approach. The Problem Solving Forum I recently held on the issue brought together partners and agencies with Dorset Police to discuss the problem and a partnership action plan is now in place to tackle it.”

According to the survey, the percentage of Dorset respondents who thought speeding was a problem has reduced by over 30% since the last national rural crime survey in 2015. This is a greater reduction than was seen nationally where the figure has come down by only 21% over the same period.

Martyn Underhill continued: “For a small force, Dorset Police is already punching well above its weight in tackling driving related offences. It’s well known No Excuse team has had many successes in tackling the ‘fatal five’ driving offences in our county, of which speeding is one. The dedicated road safety team is even being replicated in other forces.

“The Force also works closely with community speedwatch groups and funds various initiatives to educate drivers from all backgrounds about the dangers of speeding.

“Road safety is an area Dorset Police has focused on and the work it is doing is making a difference. But 30% of Dorset respondents still feel that speeding is a problem so we cannot be complacent.”

Dorset Police has had a Rural Crime Team since 2016 as a result of one of the police and crime commissioner’s election pledges. The team is dedicated to tackling rural crime and issues, with a focus on crime prevention. They have trained fellow officers, call handlers and radio operators to ensure that the Force is dealing with reports of rural crime consistently and effectively.

According to the survey approximately half (47%) of all Dorset respondents were aware of the specialist Rural Crime Team, compared to just 32% of respondents nationally who were of aware of their local rural crime teams.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill said: “Almost half of Dorset’s residents live in rural areas and it is important that they are engaged and their voices are heard. Having met with a number of farmers, rural business owners and residents on my patrol visit with the Rural Crime Team earlier this year, it is clear that progress has been made in reducing the fear of rural crime in Dorset.

“The results of the survey also confirm what we already suspected – that rural crime is massively under-reported. We want to encourage people living and/or working in rural Dorset to report crime. There seems to be a culture of not reporting crime in some rural areas and this is something the Rural Crime Team is trying to address.

“I am pleased the percentage in Dorset of people living in rural areas not reporting crime is lower (28%) than the national figure (36%). Police cannot tackle crime if they are not made aware that it is happening in the first place. Similarly, intelligence is needed to help bring offenders to justice. It is therefore vital that the public come forward with information and report crime to help the police help victims.”

The National Rural Crime Survey received over 20,000 responses with more than 600 responses coming from Dorset residents.

Message Sent By
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

Broadstone Community Speed Watch – August 2018

Making Broadstone a safer place to live

To begin with BCSW would like to place on record our thanks to all those people who visited our stand at the Broadstone Family Fun Day. We much enjoyed meeting you, and trust that we answered all your many and interesting questions. Whether or not you support our Community Speed Watch activities we will always be prepared to meet and discuss what we do, and why we carry out our operations on the roads in and around our community.

In the July issue of this magazine Broadstone Community Speed Watch sought to address some of the negative comments made recently on social media, and this article continues in that vein. The aim being to separate fiction from fact, and to offer explanations for what we do, and why we carry out Community Speed Watch operations.

Fiction: I was glared at by them!

Fact: It is never intended to further aggravate vehicle drivers by ‘glaring’ at them, regardless of whether or not they are speeding. However, in the process of recording the necessary information required as part of our reporting process, it is necessary to establish the correct registration number, the make, model and colour of every vehicle being recorded. This does require CSW team members recording such details to look closely at these vehicles. The other times that CSW team members will look purposefully into vehicles will be to ascertain whether or not the vehicle driver is wearing a seat belt, or is using a hand held mobile telephone or device.

Fiction: They were operating at a time when there were no children around?

Fact: Speed restrictions placed on roads apply 24 hrs a day, and this regardless of whether or not there are children around at the time. It is an established fact that speeding vehicles do present an increased risk of harm or serious injury to all other road users, and are a contributory factor in up to a third of all serious road collisions.

So, until the next time – Drive well and drive safely.

BCSW

Vehicle Crime Broadstone

At 1.01pm Wednesday 25th of July 2018 onwards a theft from a stationary and unattended motor vehicle occurred in the Station Approach area of Broadstone, Poole. The offender(s) stole the vehicle keys from the victim’s bag and used them to access the boot of the vehicle to steal a purse.

If you saw or heard anything suspicious or have any information please call Dorset Police on 101 or ask.ned or Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111 quoting occurrence number 55180118175.

Thank you

Message Sent By
John Slade (Dorset Police, Police Volunteer 4261, Poole )

Broadstone Community Speed Watch Statistics – June 2018

Statistics for Broadstone Community Speed Watch during June 2018.

All the roads in the table below are authorised by Dorset Police for carrying out speed watches. Those roads with no data had no speed watches during the month.

Location in Broadstone Total sessions Total Vehicles counted Total vehicles speeding
All roads (1st to 30th June 2018) 11 3723 74
Dunyeats Road 0 0 0
Higher Blandford Road 2 834 12
Lower Blandford Road 0 0 0
Springdale Road 3 1011 21
West Way 0 0 0
Pinesprings Drive 4 1294 30
Roman Road 1 205 9
Lancaster Drive 0 0 0
Clarendon Road 0 0 0
Broadstone Broadway 1 379 2

Broadstone Community Speed Watch Statistics – May 2018

Statistics for Broadstone Community Speed Watch during May 2018.

All the roads in the table below are authorised by Dorset Police for carrying out speed watches. Those roads with no data had no speed watches during the month.

Location in Broadstone Total sessions Total Vehicles counted Total vehicles speeding
All roads (1st to 31st May 2018) 14 4190 69
Dunyeats Road 0 0 0
Higher Blandford Road 5 1981 24
Lower Blandford Road 0 0 0
Springdale Road 2 485 15
West Way 0 0 0
Pinesprings Drive 5 1525 26
Roman Road 1 66 2
Lancaster Drive 1 133 2
Clarendon Road 0 0 0